As the first of the larger class of locomotives on the line, she was a regular performer and rarely out of service, operating mostly on the south line. With the support of Culture Vannin, along with Gough Ritchie Trust and Isle of Man Tourism, it was purchased and rebuilt by Alan Keef Ltd to aesthetically match the original Polar Bear of … 13), No. it was reboiler in 1923, receiving the first boiler on the IMR to carry "Ross" pop safety valves. Together with No. In 1967 it was selected as one of the static display locomotives during the Marquess of Ailsa years at St.John's station and, after closure of the Peel and Ramsey lines in 1968 relocated to Douglas Station for display purposes. Close relatives of the Manx Peacocks plied the rails of Spain, Norway, Australia, Ireland and the London’s Metropolitan Railway. 10 G.H.Wood at the time. It went on to outlast every other class of steam locomotive in regular service on the VR, and no fewer than 21 examples of the 53 originally built have survived into preservation. One of these (nominally carrying No.23) was rebuilt in 2013, the other was restored to original condition in 2014. May 4, 2020 - Modelling the railways of the Isle of Man is not a new fad. 10 G.H.Wood which re-entered service as part of the Year of Railways in 1993 but No. it carries the deeper whistle that it will be remembered for in the 1980s but the brass safety valve bonnet that originates from this locomotive was, for a time, carried by No. The owners changed name to the Isle of Man Railways and Tramways Preservation Society some years later, but carried out no further work to the locomotive until it returned to the custodianship of the railway. 13 "Kissack" also appeared in a darker green, and No. The cylinders were 11" diameter by 18" stroke, and the driving wheels 45". 11 Maitland appeared in a variation on the Indian red scheme, though it briefly ran in a dull black livery after being used for the BBC production of 'The Ginger Tree' in the late 1980s. Teddy Boston, a friend of the Marquess had a model of an Isle of Man locomotive that he had painted green and said it was effective, the rest is history! The completed locomotive was returned to the railway museum in 2020, where it took the place of No. The Isle of Man Steam Railway takes you on a journey of nostalgia as it gently rocks through the countryside in the south of the Isle of Man. After storage, she was privately purchased from the newly-nationalised railway in 1978 but remained on site, being stored in the carriage shed at Douglas until it was demolished to make way for new bus garage and offices in 1999. The train failed to stop as it arrived at Douglas Station, crashing through the buffers, and coming to rest embedded in the platform. Ramsey is reported to have been used to haul Permanent Way trains (Boyd, op. POSTCARD ISLE OF MAN Railway Locomotives. 16 Mannin.. All the steam locomotives have or had the 2-4-0 T wheel arrangement, apart from 15 Caledonia which is an 0-6-0 T . 10 and 11 at this time) and were scrapped in 1923 and 1912 respectively. Also of note is that she was one of only two engines (the other being No. While modelling the IoMR in the smaller scales is either strictly kit or scratched built, there are ready to run IoMR locomotives and rolling stock in the garden railway scale of 15mm to 1ft on 45mm gauge track. New MP500 locomotive for Isle of Man Railway MP&ES manufactured this 42.5 ton Diesel Electric locomotive for the Isle of Man Railway. Having been re-boilered in 1959 this ensured her future well into the final years of company operation, through the Marquess of Ailsa years and into nationalisation. Dolphin and Walrus are diesel locomotives currently on the Groudle Glen Railway. The Isle of Man Railway is a narrow gauge steam-operated railway connecting Douglas with Castletown and Port Erin on the Isle of Man. 2 was named after the Earls of Derby who owned the Isle of Man before it was sold to the British monarch and is often seen in early photographs without it back cab sheet (No. When the railway museum was opened in 1975 it was given pride of place and it seemed that was the end of the line. W8 Freshwater is a Stroudley A1X Terrier class 0-6-0T steam locomotive, which is based at the Isle of Wight Steam Railway. She was withdrawn from service, having been station shunter at Douglas for a number of years, in 1960 and was one of the static display locomotives during the Marquess of Ailsa years. Modelling the railways of the Isle of Man is not a new fad. The south based version has had a somewhat crude cab fitted to protect the driver from the elements. Painted in the now "fleet" livery of Indian red, it previous incarnation had been a deep Brunswick green, not thought to have been an historic livery of the railway but more a "nice colour" at the time. In order to keep costs down the company decided upon a gauge of 3ft. 4 "Loch" in a non-historical but very attractive shade of maroon. Built in 1880 (Beyer, Peacock works number 2038), this locomotive has the dubious honour of being the first locomotive to have been withdrawn from service, as early as 1947 which accounts for the lack of photographs of her. 10 "G.H.Wood" which re-entered service as part of the "Year of Railways" in 1993 but No. In issue No. 18 "Ailsa" was all over white upon delivery and there has been mention that it would be painted into another colour, spring green being mooted owing to the loco's name, but this has yet to happen. 12 gained small tank side number plates. The locomotive is currently stored and unserviceable, it future remains uncertain. These features, together with a non-prototypical blue livery gave the loco a somewhat odd appearance when compared with it shed-mates, and the look was not widely liked. She was one of two (the other being No. Stored for several years together with No. 11 "Maitland" appeared in a variation on the Indian red scheme, followed by the most bizarre incarnation of them all, a royal blue No. Locomotives of the Isle of Man Steam Railway. This unique 0-6-0T locomotive dates from 1885 and is the only engine on the line to have been built by Dübs & Co, of Glasgow; purchased to tackle the steep gradients of the Foxdale Railway it was ideally suited to the job. Whilst all from the same manufacturer broadly to the same design, the Beyer, Peacocks all have slight differences; for example, the first trio have their nameplates mounted forward of the injector feed pipe, whereas Nos. As part of the Year of Railways celebrations in 1993 and following competition in the local press, the locomotive was named Viking, the name originally to have been allocated to No. Another one-off order from 1910 (Beyer, Peacock works number 5382), unlucky 13 (latterly referred to as 12a by some of the railway's staff) was one of the backbones of the railway's fleet, having seldom been out of service until withdrawn with defective boiler at Christmas 1992; the boiler was refurbished and placed in the frames of No. The "Indian Red" paint as produced in the railway's workshop and tended to oxidise over time. Boyd in his "Isle of Man Railway (Oakwood Press 1967) points out that the Sharpies were dimensionally similar to the Beyer Peacock locomotives built for the IMR. Along the journey there are beautiful farmland and coastal views surrounding the railway. 6 Peveril in the museum does however retain it patched tanks. This railway is the remainder of what was a much larger network (over 46 miles in length) that also served the western town of Peel, the northern town of Ramsey and the small mining village of Foxdale. This remained the standard livery of the line, with slight variations, down to the end of World War II. 16 Mannin.. Apart from being constructed for 3' 0" gauge, the major dimensions are identical to the Norwegian Class IV "Trygve". Of course, now she wears the familiar Indian red but is distinguished from her shed-mates by carrying a Legs Of Mann and "4" numeral on her buffer beam. 12 and 13 upon delivery but this changed so that by the 1950s they carried the standard one. They saw very little use on the line after takeover (the railway having only just purchased Nos. The Dublin and South Eastern Railway 15 and 16 were a pair of 2-6-0 steam locomotives which were built for the heavy goods (freight) traffic on the Dublin to Wexford main line of the Dublin and South Eastern Railway (DSER). Not all Loco's are currently in service or indeed located on the railway. Interestingly, she is the only locomotive that has ever left Manx metals having left the island in 1977 and now resides as a sectionalised exhibition display at the Museum of Science and Industry in Manchester, a stone's throw from her birthplace. As the first of the larger class of locomotives on the line, it was a regular performer and rarely out of service, operating mostly on the south line. Further testing saw the locomotive perform several passenger duties, notably at the head of the railway's dining train, and it is presently stored without its wheelsets which are with contractors. The Metropolitan Railway A Class and B Class were 4-4-0T condensing steam locomotives built for the Metropolitan Railway by Beyer Peacock, first used in 1864. When delivered to the railway, the locomotive carried an olive green livery with vermilion and yellow lining and the name carried on the side water tank in gold leaf with blue shadowing, with distinctive round "spectacle" cab windows back and front. 5 has had no attention for many years and is a sorry sight, still wearing her 1967 spring green livery, now very faded. The Isle of Man is a piece of forgotten Britain. 12 was extensively overhauled in 2001 it took was fitted with the original deeper whistle, later being replaced by the medium toned one. No. 5 & 12 ever carried a brass numeral above the nameplate, although when No. The preservationist group Isle of Man Steam Railway Supporters' Association have campaigned for their completion, especially in conjunction with the failed commuter train services that were laid on by the railway in connection with the T.T. 4 features fleet number and three legs of man in brass on the buffer beam, etc. At this time it was stored in Douglas works and it wasn't until 1992 when sister No. When the County Donegal Railways Joint Committee was selling surplus assets in the early 1960s, the Isle of Man Railway were looking for a cheap alternative to their ageing steam locomotive fleet and purchased these two railcars. J.I.C. It has since been sold off-island. The third, much deeper tone of whistle was carried by Nos. It is the remainder of what was a much larger network that also served the western town of Peel, the northern town of Ramsey and the small mining village of Foxdale. In 2001 it was announced that it would be the recipient of a new boiler and by the season of 2006 it was returned to steam. The higher "pea" whistle on the pre-1905 locomotives also has two variants, with 1-6 being higher than 7-9 and it was the distinctive shrill original whistle that No. The British Rail (BR) Class 35 is a class of mixed-traffic B-B diesel locomotive with hydraulic transmission. No.17 "Viking" was a deep green colour upon arrival in 1992 and was repainted (but with black/orange lining added) for the naming ceremony in 1993. This unique locomotive dates from 1885 and is the only engine on the line to have been built by Dübs and Company, of Glasgow; purchased to tackle the steep gradients of the Foxdale Railway she was ideally suited to the job. it was partially repainted in the 1980s into a non-standard brown livery (one which is thought to have been carried by some locomotives based on early colour photos) with black/orange lining. 5) to carry a brass fleet number above the name plate on tank. No. The locomotives of the Isle of Man Railway were provided exclusively by Beyer, Peacock & Company of Manchester, England between 1873 and 1926; other locomotives that appear on this list were inherited as part of the take-over of the Manx Northern Railway and Foxdale Railway in 1905, when the railway also purchased two more locomotives from Beyer, Peacock. There is a railway museum at Port Erin. 17 saw some use in traffic during the 2010 season owing to steam locomotive failure; it is usually in operation as part of the annual railway-based events Rush Hour in April/May each year and the Manx Heritage Transport Festival each July. Sign in for checkout Check out as guest . Painted in the now "fleet" livery of Indian red, her previous incarnation had been in and deep Brunswick green, not thought to have been an historic livery of the railway but more a "nice colour" at the time. Happily, the owners offered the boiler (now complete) to donor locomotive No. Three small boiler locomotives - 4, 5, and 6 - were rebuilt to the Medium boiler variant, complete with 480 gallon water tanks, in 1907-14. The boiler is currently stored at Douglas, while the chassis and superstructure are currently stored in the carriage shed at Port Erin. It was at this point that No. 4 has the strange title of being what must surely be the first locomotive ever to (re)enter service on the day the line closed. 16, with its 3'6" diameter boiler pressed at 180psi, and 12" by 18" cylinders is the solitary example of the "Large Boiler" variant. There are also two Wickham-built four-wheel railcars used by the permanent way gangs, and these are often transferred between the Manx Electric Railway and the line as required. While modelling the IoMR in the smaller scales is either strictly kit or scratched built, there are ready to run IoMR locomotives and rolling stock in the garden railway scale of 15mm to 1ft on 45mm gauge… Her smokebox door went missing at some point and is now replaced with a wooden version. 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